Adolescence Essays (Examples)

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Adolescent Psychology Issues There Will Always Be

Words: 932 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1277504

Adolescent Psychology Issues

There will always be some conflict between adolescents and their parents because growing up means finding one's own way -- relating to the world through youthful, sometimes naive eyes -- while also being instructed and guided by one's parents. But the intensity of conflict and the reasons for conflict in this parent-adolescent genre differ dramatically, and have different impacts on adolescents as they grow and mature. The research article by Barbara Allison and Jerelyn Schultz delves into the parent-adolescent conflict during the "early years" of adolescence, which the authors claim has received "much less attention" than the adolescent years (12 to 18).

Parent-Adolescent Conflict in Early Adolescence

According to Allison et al., their checklist given to 357 young people (grades 6, 7, and 8) revealed many conflicts with parents "…over a sizable number of issues." And during this period of adolescent -- parental contentiousness, Allison's research shows…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allison, Barbara N., and Schultz, Jerelyn B. (2004). Parent-Adolescent Conflict In Early

Adolescence. Adolescence, 39(153), 101-117.
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Adolescents Undergo Different Changes Which Also Come

Words: 1549 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16610109

Adolescents undergo different changes, which also come with many challenges. Adolescent interviews can be conducted to find out about different factors affecting their lives. Some of these factors include life-course trajectories, teenage parenthood, early marriage and different body changes affecting them. These children can also have intergenerational changes that can affect them. These changes occur since they use up most time with their friends, family, classmates and even neighbors. Intergenerational effects can be studied by looking collective socialization of peers at home and school. The interviewer should be conscious about adolescents' developmental tasks and processes. The interviewer can also explore different areas, from identity, family school performance, peer group and sex.

Family patterns encountered by the children show that the patterns are most influential during adolescence. Adolescent start to look at their future at this stage and this makes them form collective socialization about family forms, in the social context…… [Read More]

References

Bonio, S.C. (2005). Adolescents and Risk Behaviours. Chicago: Springer.

Neinsten, L. (2010). Adolescent Healthcare: A Practical Guide. Atlanta: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Olson, S.N. (2011). Toward an Intergrated Science of Research. London: National Academic Press.
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Adolescent Learner Unique Needs the

Words: 2696 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88845591

Matching students' interests with learning objectives will increase the chances of students' learning. They tend to use it and remember it long after. Using literature relevant to adolescents, for example, will raise their literacy and capacity to address contemporary issues affecting them. Reading materials about adolescents and for adolescents are another window into their world that teachers should be looking into. This is the time when they should read about themselves rather than simply sitting down for an hour and taking notes (Chckley).

Applying Learning in the Community through Projects

Projects, which give meaning to learning in the classroom, will leave an impression in adolescents' mind (Checkley, 2004). Learning about Veterans Day as a service-learning project, for example, demonstrates this. Students may be asked to identify a veteran in their family or among their acquaintances or friends. They may be asked to write the veteran a letter of appreciation or…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Checkley, K. (2004). Meeting the needs of the adolescent learner. Vo. 46 # 5 Education

Update: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Retrieved on July

21, 2012 from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/ed_update/ecc200408.checkley.pdf

Cherry, K. (2012). Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. About.com: The New
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Adolescent Bullying

Words: 1224 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78461700

Adolescent Bullying Fact Sheet

Nursing

Etiology/Pathophysiology/Incidence/Prevalence

Opinions regarding the etiology of bullying vary. As with many behaviors, there are those that contend that bullies learn and practice behaviors of aggression and violence in the home environment. Some argue that bullies hurt others because they experience abuse in their own lives and manifest their feelings of disgust & horror at their own weakness or vulnerability by hurting others. There are also arguments that some people become bullies because they lack sufficient social intelligence, awareness and skill. They may perceive aggression or hostility in others, including in their words & behaviors, when the person victimized by the bully, truly shows no signs nor has no intentions of violence or conflict. The pathophysiology of bullies includes higher blood pressure, subpar impulse control, and other physical indicators of stress, anger, rage, and even confusion. Those who are victimized may sweat excessively, have anxiety attacks,…… [Read More]

References:

Coopers, G.D., Clements, T.C., & Holt, K.E. (2012). Examining Childhood Bullying and Adolescent Suicide: Implications for School Nurses. The Journal of School Nursing, 28(4), 275 -- 283.

National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center. (2002). Facts for Teens: Bullying. Rockville, MD. Available from: www.safeyouth.org. 2013 January 16.

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. (2011). Facts for Families -- Bullying. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Journal, 80(2011), 1 -- 3.
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Adolescent and Child Development Lawrence

Words: 2311 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74297560

The transition from pre-conventional to conventional moral development is changing one's view from selfishness to responsibility for others. The transition from conventional to post conventional development is from goodness to truth that "they are people, too." Gilligan's theory supports that there is more than one dimension to moral reasoning, whereas Kohlberg's theory is focused on a male-centered view.

7.

An individual employing problem-focused coping strategies will target the cause of their stress and focus on the problem that is causing the stressful situation. People typically try to learn about the problem and develop skills to manage the situation. Problem-focused coping strategies work best in situations the individual can control, for example, studying for an exam and work-based stressors. In circumstances that are out of an individual's control, such as death and coping with loss, one can use emotion-focused coping strategies. Emotion-focused coping involves reducing stress that is coupled with negative…… [Read More]

#8 http://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/display.asp?id=6704

#9  http://www.ldonline.org/article/Learning_Disabilities_and_Young_Children%3A_Identification_and_Intervention 

#10 http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/reports/partlist.htm#adolescenttrouble
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Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments 10-Year Critical

Words: 14685 Length: 53 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28105173

Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments: 10-Year Critical eview of the esearch Literature

Over ten million teenagers in the United States admit in a national survey that they drink alcohol, although it is illegal under the age of 21 in all states. In some studies, nearly one-quarter of school-age children both smoked cigarettes and drank alcohol. Over four thousand adolescents every day try marijuana for the first time. The dangers of use, abuse and dependency on each of these substances have been established. When we also consider that these three substances are considered gateway drugs, that is, drugs whose use is likely to lead to experimentation with "hard" drugs, the potential problem of such widespread use is even more severe. Additionally, use of these substances is known to co-occur with a number of other psychiatric conditions as well as health issues such as the incidence of sexually-transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies and…… [Read More]

References

Aarons, Gregory A.; Brown, Sandra A.; Hough, Richard L.; Garland, Ann F.; Wood, Patricia A. Prevalence of Adolescent Substance Use Disorders Across Five Sectors of Care (Statistical Data Included). Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, April 2001 v40 i4 p419

Adger, Hoover Jr.; Werner, Mark J. The pediatrician (role in treatment of alcohol-related disorders). Alcohol Health and Research World, Spring 1994 v18 n2 p121 (6)

Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Symptoms of Adolescents. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of the San Fernando Valley, Inc. [Online]. Retrieved January 20, 2003 from http:/ / www.ncadd-sfv.org/symptoms/teen_symptoms.html

Alcohol use and abuse: a pediatric concern (American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse). Pediatrics, March 1995 v95 n3 p439 (4)
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Adolescent Influences and Adjustments What

Words: 6386 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72263638

The key years during which experimentation occurs - between 13 and 16.

Kobus discusses influences that launch an adolescent's smoking habit from several perspectives. First, the "social learning theory": relationships that are "more intimate" and that are developed "earlier in the youth's experiences" and thought to be more important; and youths are more likely to "imitate the smoking habits" (or non-smoking habits) of those with whom they have the closes and most frequent contact. Second, the "primary socialization theory" takes into consideration influences of the family, schools, and peer clusters; this theory also gives consideration to an adolescent's "individual personality traits" like self-esteem, anxiety, "sensation seeking and psychopathology" that are "direct influences on drug use and deviance," Kobus writes. hen the bonds a youth has with family and school are "weak," the role of peer clusters is "heightened"; and of course if the individual has low self-esteem, the peer cluster…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American School Board Journal. (2007). Violent video games poison the teenage brain:

Study. National School Boards Association.

Crosby, Richard; Voisin, Dexter; Salazar, Laura F.; DiClement, Ralph J.; Yarber, William L.;

Caliendo, Angela M. (2006). Family Influences and biologically Confirmed Sexually
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Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction

Words: 3125 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60038826

Economic deprivation arises from various activities and aspects of the family in attempts to minimize the threats affecting the at-risk youth. Some of the factors affecting the economic deprivation in relation to at-risk youth within the family include rehabilitation fee, treatment fee, and addiction cost thus affecting the overall economic level of the family (McWhirter,2013). This is a problem with the scarce family resources thus the need to adopt and integrate effective elements towards minimization or management of the problems affecting the growth and development of the family members in relation to the existing factors.

Another critical family problem or issue relates to the lack of adults and parental role models under the influence massive drug addiction thus affecting the growth and development of the youths within the family unit. It is also essential to note that at-risk youths increases parental criminality and development of family violence attitudes or anti-social…… [Read More]

References

Monica H. Swahn & Robert M. Bossarte. (2009). Assessing and Quantifying High Risk:

Comparing Risky Behaviours by Youth in an Urban, Disadvantaged Community with Nationally Representative Youth. Public Health Rep. 124(2): 224

Ken C. Winters et al., (2011). Advances in Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 13(5): 416 -- 421.

Kuther TL & Posada M. (2004). Children and adolescents' capacity to provide informed consent for participation in research. Adv Psychol Res. 32:163-73.
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Adolescent Growth and Development Huebner

Words: 347 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28304557

The lessons teens learn during this potentially idealistic period are lessons the teens can remembers throughout their lives, and hopefully use to become more involved and concerned adult citizens.

Set limits for behavior, but show respect for teens. Demand respect from teenagers, this article counsels both patents and educators. But also show respect for teens. Just as, for example, a parent ought to hold fast to a curfew, a teacher should hold fast to deadlines and try to create good habits that will last the adolescent for the rest of his or her lifetime. Requirements should be reasonable, and developmentally appropriate, but they should not infantilize the teen. Rather, teachers must treat adolescents as adolescents, not as children or as adults. Ideally, using the teen's developing self-awareness as social consciousness to create a more positive identity and role for the adolescent as a student and citizen should be the goal…… [Read More]

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Adolescent Egocentrism and Delinquent Behaviors

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63742191

Adolescent Egocentrism

Posting #3 ead articles choose interest. Analyze articles describe leadership roles discussed. Compare attributes nurse leaders. •http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_health/home/News/women/mch_midwives.

The influence of adolescent egocentrism (personal fable, imaginary audience, invincibility) on delinquent behavior

Parents often refer to adolescents as egocentric and self-centered. However, this is not simply a subjective moral judgment of a frustrated mother or father -- it is an identified product of the biological and social experience of being an adolescent. Adolescent egocentrism is different from the egocentrism of a very young child that perceives no differentiation between self and other (Alberts, Elkind & Ginsberg 2007: 71). With adolescents, egocentrism manifests itself in what is called the 'imaginary audience' or the belief that everyone in the world is equally preoccupied with the adolescent as him or herself. An adolescent might spend hours getting ready to go to a casual party than an adult might prepare for a half hour…… [Read More]

References

Alberts, Amy, Elkind, David & Ginsberg, Stephen. (2006). The personal fable and risk-taking in early adolescence. J Youth Adolescence (2007) 36:71 -- 76
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Adolescent Self-Portrait

Words: 590 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55270318

Adolescence

Adolescent Self-Portrait

Adolescence: A conflicted life period

Adolescence is often considered to be a particularly 'fraught' time during the average individual's life history. Although the construction of adolescence and the age during which someone is considered to be an adolescent may vary from culture to culture, most societies define a certain period of time as 'not childhood' and 'not adulthood.' There are common physiological changes seen in all adolescents such as menstruation in females; lowered voice in males; and increased height and body hair in both genders. Adolescents also begin to experience and experiment with showing sexual desire. However, these changes can cause great anxiety and confusion, as the adolescent struggles with his or her emerging adolescent identity.

Females in particular tend to be more anxious about their body image than boys because of the great emphasis placed upon female beauty within the culture as a measure of self-worth…… [Read More]

References

Zastrow, C. & Kirst-Ashman, K. (2010). Understanding human behavior and the social

Environment. 8th ed. Cengage Learning.
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Adolescent Substance Abuse and Depression

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70185528

His article does an excellent job of discussing in comprehensible terms the recent research which has addressed the current state of knowledge about the relationship between substance abuse amongst teens and mood disorders and provides a breakdown of possible treatment options.

Flaherty, L., & Flaherty, M. (2005). Adolescent psychiatry: he annals of the American society for adolescent psychiatry (Vol. 29). Hillsdale, New Jersey: Analytic Press.

his resource is from a special edition of Adolescent Psychiatry that pertains specifically to issues that arise along with adolescent substance abuse issues. he topics within range from teenagers with Ecstacy addiction to gambling problems. o the practitioner and the interested adult, parent, or educator, the information within this journal provides a fastidious and compelling look into the vast range of issues that may coincide with an adolescent's substance abuse problem. With specific regard to adolescents, depression, and substance abuse, two articles are especially illuminating:…… [Read More]

This resource is from a special edition of Adolescent Psychiatry that pertains specifically to issues that arise along with adolescent substance abuse issues. The topics within range from teenagers with Ecstacy addiction to gambling problems. To the practitioner and the interested adult, parent, or educator, the information within this journal provides a fastidious and compelling look into the vast range of issues that may coincide with an adolescent's substance abuse problem. With specific regard to adolescents, depression, and substance abuse, two articles are especially illuminating: one which discusses comorbidity amongst teenagers with depression and substance abuse issues and another which discusses issues related to dual diagnoses in adolescents with depression and substance abuse issues.

Schwartzberg, A.Z. (Ed.). (1998). The Adolescent in Turmoil. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Retrieved April 17, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26000946

Schwartzberg addresses several of the salient issues that have arisen in modern times with regard to adolescents and mental health conflicts. A significant amount of the book focuses upon diagnosing and treating adolescents struggling with depression. Within this text, he also addresses the normal and pathological adolescent as well as the overall development of the adolescent which can be helpful in addressing the differences amongst adolescents with depression and those without. There are additional sections that discuss specific issues that afflict troubled adolescents such as eating disorders, mood disorders, aggressive and violent behavior, and suicide. This text is written in comprehensible terms and the reader does not need to have extensive medical background to understand its contents.
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Adolescent Childbearing in Africa Adolescent

Words: 1657 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44998539

It produced a net increase in perceived benefits of protective behavior and in self-efficacy among both males and females, and a reduction in perceived barriers to protective behavior among females. Consistent with these changes, it was also associated with a reduction in risky sexual behavior among young men and an increase in contraceptive use among young men and women (Agha, 2002, p. 67+).

Agha also noted that there was more positive change among young women than among young men, a fact that "may reflect a better ability of these adolescent sexual health interventions to address the concerns of women than of men, or a greater receptivity to such interventions among young women than among young men" (2002, p. 67+). Because of the success of this program, however, Agha suggests that means of reaching young men to the same extent are worthy of additional study, and multi-media, educational programs of long…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Agha, Sohail. "A Quasi-Experimental Study to Assess the Impact of Four Adolescent Sexual Health Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa." International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 28, no. 2 (2002), vol. 28, no. 2, p. 67+. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from www.questia.com.

Dijamba, Yanyi K. "Social Capital and Premarital Sexual Activity in Africa: The Case of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo." Journal Title: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 32, no. 4, (2003), 327+. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from www.questia.com.

Kiragu, Karungari and Laura Schwab Zabin. "The Health Consequences of Adolescent Sexual and Fertility Behavior in Sub-Saharan Africa." Studies in Family Planning, vol. 29, no. 2 (1998), 210+. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from www.questia.com.

Koblinsky, Marjorie A., Oona M.R. Campbell, S.D. Harlow. "Mother and more: A broader perspective on women's health." In The Health of Women: A Global Perspective. Ed. Marlene A. Koblinsky, Judith Timyan, and Jill Gay. Boulder, CO. Westview Press. (1993) Pp.33-62.
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Adolescents' Emotional Adjustment Reaction Paper School Organization

Words: 1197 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55905035

Adolescents' Emotional Adjustment

Reaction Paper

School Organization and Adolescents' Emotional Adjustment

att's article explores the connection between school organization and adolescents' mental health. There is a commonly held belief that adolescents receive a superior educational and interpersonal experience in private schools and small schools. att cites studies by Coleman and others that have given support to the perceived superiority of private schools. Coleman's findings in support of private schools did not however address mental health, but were instead limited to academic achievement.

att's questions "Are private schools better not only for academic achievement but for mental health? Are small schools associated with broad indicators of emotional well-being?" (2003, p.345) form the basis for her study. att's study addresses these issues by examining three indicators of adolescents' emotional adjustment: depression, suicide attempts and violent dispositions.

att's study analyzed data collected by the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent health, which surveyed health-related…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Watt, T.T. (2003). Are small schools better for adolescents' emotional adjustment? Sociology of Education, 76(4), 344-367.
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Adolescents & Advertising Media Messages Examination of

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53278691

Adolescents & Advertising Media Messages

Examination of a Commercial

The advertisement chosen for examination in this brief study is Britney Spears Pepsi commercial in 2010, which was part of the advertising during the World Cup. The intended audience for the advertisement is the general audience and specifically male and female young people. The ad features Brittney Spears singing, drinking Pepsi, and volley a ball. Brittney appears beautiful and sexy in this commercial and gives the appearance that drinking Pepsi will make everyone athletic and sexy. This ad would be interpreted of course by each gender differently as the male gender would interpret the commercial to mean that drinking Pepsi would ensure that they attract sexy girls and females would view the commercial as appealing to them to drink Pepsi to ensure that they are hot and sexy like Brittney Spears. This ad is not accurate in its portrayal of body…… [Read More]

(13) Kaiser Family Foundation (2005). Generation M: Media in the lives of eight to eighteen-year-olds. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.kff.org/entmedia/entmedia030905pkg.cfm.

(14) How to Magazines Effect Body Image (2008) Center on Media and Child Health. Education.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.education.com/reference/article/how-magazines-affect-body-image/ 

(15) Ransohoff, J. (2010) Teens and the Media. Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Retrieved from:  http://www.pamf.org/teen/life/bodyimage/media.html
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Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa Is a

Words: 1364 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97164904

In fact, even executives in fashion and beauty magazines see an alarming trend of "too thin" to the point of looking emaciated and unhealthy -- certainly not a look that "sells" (Wilson 542).

What is happening is a continual push to be something different, not because there is actually anything wrong with us -- at all. It is because advertising tells us that something is wrong. Advertising is part of the marketing mix that is designed to persuade a consumer to purchase something. Of course, there are many ways of doing this, and the "science" of this media has certainly evolved in the last century. Advertising is subliminal, sophisticated, pervasive, covert, overt, and a seminal part of the contemporary world. However, advertising has become so sophisticated that it sends messages both overt and covert that even if we are not paying attention to the exact product, the images we see…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Croll, J. "From Body Image and Adolescents." Elements of Arguments. Ed. a. Rottenberg and D. Winchell. 9th. New York: St. Martin's, 2010. 536-41.

Wilson, E. "When Is Thin Too Thin?" Elements of Arguments. Ed. a. Rottenberg and D. Winchell. 9th. New York: St. Martin's, 2010. 542-4.
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Adolescent Obesity in Saudi Arabia

Words: 3430 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52239278



There are remedies (albeit not easy ones for the individuals involved), as suggested by the research. However, and this is very important, the current public health approaches that the Saudi government has taken, as Mabrey et al. (2010) note, have focused fairly narrowly on medical approaches. This focus includes research that has been conducted on metabolic syndrome (which is caused primarily by being overweight). This is caused by clear-cut factors and has a number of possible poor consequences.

Mabrey et al. (2010) note that metabolic syndrome is on average 10 to 15% higher in the GCC states than in the rest of world and that females are disproportionately affected by metabolic syndrome. These researchers are among those who note that a strictly medical approach to such medical problems is far from sufficient. For while metabolic syndrome itself can be identified and described in purely medical terms, such an approach does…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, S. & Nordsieck, M. (1960). Relationship of excess weight in children and adults. Public Health 75: 263-273.

Alghamdi, K.M. (2010). The use of topical bleaching agents among women: A cross-sectional study of knowledge, attitude and practices. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 24(10): 1214-1219.

Al-Qahtani, D.A., Imtiaz, M.L., Saad, O.S., & Hussein, N.M. (2006). A comparison of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Saudi adult females using two definitions. Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 4(3): 204-214.

Al Qauhiz, N.M. (2010). Obesity among Saudi Female University Students: Dietary Habits and Health Behaviors. Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association 85(1-2):45-59.
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adolescent development and film breakfast club

Words: 1347 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43127785

Adolescence is an especially critical development stage for any individual. At this stage, individuals not only experience biological changes, but also become more aware of gender roles and expectations and experience cognitive development. Family and school become social incubators that trigger changes and psychosocial responses in adolescents. The film The Breakfast Club shows how a group of five adolescents go through critical changes in this stage of their life. This paper will highlight the developmental markers observed in one character depicted the film, Claire. Clare will be used as a case study to explore developmental issues related to gender, biology, and cognition. The paper also highlights various socialization agents (specifically school and family) and how they impact the individual’s self-concept, identity, and social role.

The Breakfast Club features five teenagers detained all day at Shermer High School. Several developmental markers are evident in the film. One of the markers is…… [Read More]

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Adolescent Environment

Words: 2621 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99543220

Adolescent Environment

The subject interviewed is a 17-year-old Hispanic male from Cleveland, Ohio. Although his legal name is Harley, this adolescent chooses to call himself by the name "Renegade." Renegade lives in a loft with 12 other boys ranging from the ages of 15 to 27 above a rare book store in a historic and impoverished section of the city. Renegade was either orphaned or abandoned at a young age, and spent many years bouncing around foster homes and group homes as a ward of the state of California. Since leaving the care of the state, Renegade was able to uncover many mysteries about his past that were officially "sealed" regarding his biological family. Renegade was not given any information about his ethnic background as a child, but his mocha-colored skin and dark, striking hair obviously set him apart as an ethnic minority. There were Latino and Mexican boys in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aranel et al. (2005) "Erik Erikson." Wikipedia. Retrieved 3/10/2005 from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_H._Erikson

Brainmeta. (2004) "Jean Piaget" Retrieved 3/10/2005 from: http://brainmeta.com/personality/piaget.php

Huitt, W., & Hummel, J. (2003). Piaget's theory of cognitive development. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved [3/10/2005] from http://chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/cogsys/piaget.html.

Karp, J. (2004) "Erikson's stages of psychosocial development." (2005) "Erik Erikson." Wikipedia. Retrieved 3/10/2005 from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erikson%27s_stages_of_psychosocial_development
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Adolescent Treatment Interventions and Youth

Words: 1358 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81074068

This research considered this by looking at a key constituent of low self-control which is the risk seeking tendency in order to decide its constancy and change throughout early childhood, its influences on changes in criminal behavior, and its receptiveness to a complete delinquency lessening program. These matters were looked at with information from the Children at isk (CA) program, an arbitrarily allocated interference that looked at early youth. The examination exposed considerable reliability in risk seeking, but there was proof of change as well, and these alterations were connected with contemporary alterations in delinquency. isk seeking alterations were not a consequence of contribution in the CA program, in spite of that program's achievement at dropping some appearance of delinquency (Hay, Meldrum, Forrest and Ciaravolo, 2010).

Part II: Assessment of the main strengths of the reading with particular emphasis on its utility for understanding adolescent development or social work intervention.…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, Michael W., Hawkins, J. David, Brown, Eric C, Briney, John S., Oesterle, Sabrina and Abbott, Robert D. (2010). Implementation of the Communities that Care Prevention

System by Coalitions in the Community Youth Development Study. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(2), p. 245 -- 258.

Hay, Carter, Meldrum, Ryan, Forrest, Walter and Ciaravolo, Emily. (2010). Stability and Change

in Risk Seeking: Investigating the Effects of an Intervention Program. Retrieved December 6, 2010, from  http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/8/2/91
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Adolescent Video Game Internet Game Playing

Words: 1468 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23641116



This term seems to have been coined in the 1990s when researchers were attempting to describe a constellation of behaviors observed in persons using the Internet to such an extent that it began to cause other aspects of their lives to become dysfunctional. The DSM-IV disorder most similar to the pattern of behaviors observed with overuse of video games is pathological gambling. Presumably, the more colloquial term addiction was derived from the similarities to gambling addiction. For this report, this pattern of heavy video game playing is referred to as "video game overuse." (Khan, 2007) Kahn additionally relates that: "Symptoms of time usage and social dysfunction/disruption appear in patterns similar to that of other addictive disorders. It is not clear whether withdrawal symptoms are associated with video game overuse; some excessive users do not exhibit "cravings" for the games if they are unavailable, while other users insist they cannot reduce…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hauge, Marny R. And Gentile, Douglas a. (2003) Video game addiction among adolescents: associations with academic performance and aggression - Presented at Society for research in child development conference, April 2 -- 3 Tampa Florida.

Special Report: Video Game Addiction (2005) New Orleans WDSU.com. 24 Feb 2005. Online available at http://www.wdsu.com/news/4160216/detail.html.

Khan, Mohamed K. (2007) Emotional and Behavioral Effects, Including Addictive Potential, of Video Games. Report of the Council on Science and Public Health. CSAPH Report 12-a-07

Computer Games Addiction (2005) National Institute on Media and the Family. Online available at http://www.mediafamily.org/facts/facts_gameaddiction.shtml
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Adolescents Growing Up in Poverty

Words: 1726 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89251843

On the other hand, 'resistance for liberation' may have the obverse effect causing children (in this case adolescents) to take these self-same disabling elements and use them for their growth and success.

Poverty may be a social construct but it need not tarnish an individual for life. Ultimately, the individual decides what to do with his or her life, and the same circumstances that can turn one into a drug-doped self-destructed convict can turn another into a bastion of society.

eferences

Ayers. W. A kind and just parents. The children of juvenile court

Leadbetter, B.., & Niobe, W. (2007). Urban girls revisited: Building strengths. NY Univ. Press. NY.

Lichter, D., Shannahan, M., & Gardner, E. (2002). Helping others: The effects of childhood poverty and family instability on prosocial behavior, Youth and Society, 34, 89-119

Martin, D., Martin, M., Gell, ., Davis, C., & Guerreri, K. (2008). Adolescence, 43, 608-711.

Niobe.…… [Read More]

References

Ayers. W. A kind and just parents. The children of juvenile court

Leadbetter, B.R., & Niobe, W. (2007). Urban girls revisited: Building strengths. NY Univ. Press. NY.

Lichter, D., Shannahan, M., & Gardner, E. (2002). Helping others: The effects of childhood poverty and family instability on prosocial behavior, Youth and Society, 34, 89-119

Martin, D., Martin, M., Gell, R., Davis, C., & Guerreri, K. (2008). Adolescence, 43, 608-711.
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Adolescent Inhalant Abuse Inhalant Abuse

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49060929

There is also a strong peer-association element to inhalant abuse which is why identification of at-risk behaviors, preventative counseling, and education are among the most effective means of prevention (NIDA, 2010; Wu, Pilowsky, & Schlenger, 2004).

Interventions

By the time pre-teens and adolescents begin experimenting with alcohol, tobacco products, chemical inhalants, and recreational drugs, it is much more difficult to intervene effectively than it is before those behaviors first emerge (Wu, Pilowsky, & Schlenger, 2004). Since inhalant abuse is one of the first forms of substance abuse available to children, the most effective approach to prevention and intervention is educational programs targeting elementary school children. By socializing younger children to recognize the dangers associated with inhalants, it is possible to reduce the likelihood that they will participate in that behavior by the time they reach the age of 12, which is when most participants begin experimenting with it for the…… [Read More]

References

NIDA. (2010). Inhalant Abuse. Accessed 1 November, 2010, from:

http://www.nida.nih.gov/researchreports/inhalants/whatare.html.

Wu, L.T., Pilowsky, D.J., and Schlenger, W.E.J. "Inhalant abuse and dependence among adolescents in the United States." American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Vol. 43, No. 10; 2004: 1206-14.

Inhalant Abuse
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Adolescent Youth and Society Runaways

Words: 1263 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48461084

This was equivalent to those youth utilizing ongoing, long-term services (Pollio, Thompson, Tobias, eid and Spitznagel, 2006).

Critique

There are several significant limitations that must be considered when looking at the results of this study. First, there was lack of a control group which limits the conclusions that can be drawn concerning causal assertions about the effectiveness of services. It is thought that future research on service use for this population needs to include a comparison condition of other troubled youth, perhaps runaway/homeless youth not seeking crisis services. Features of the sampling strategy limited the generalization of the findings. Since the sample included only service-using youth, it is not generalizable to the entire runaway/homeless population. The authors believed that the youth in this sample were representative of the population of service-using runaway/homeless youth from Missouri, Illinois, Nebraska, and Kansas. However, other research has suggested that this population is not representative…… [Read More]

References

Pollio, David E., Thompson, Sanna J., Tobias, Lisa, Reid, Donna and Spitznagel, Edward.

(2006). Longitudinal Outcomes for Youth Receiving Runaway/Homeless Shelter

Services. Journal of Youth & Adolescence. 35(5), p. 852-859.
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Adolescent's Awareness and Their Lack

Words: 11261 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10498624

Studying a sample of 153 top commercial Web sites directed at children under 13, the CME found that COPPA has spurred changes in Web sites' data collection practices. Web sites had limited the amount and type of information (e.g., name, postal address, phone number, age) collected from children, and there was a three-fold increase in the posting of privacy policy information explaining sites' data collection practices. A few sites found innovative solutions (e.g., anonymous registration) that allowed children to interact with site content without revealing personal information. Overall, however, the Center found that many sites were not doing their best to comply with the provisions: Most (66%) did not place links to privacy policies in "clear and prominent" places, and only some sites (38%) obtained parental consent in accordance with key provisions. Further, researchers pointed out that in trying to discourage children under 13 from entering personal information, some sites…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bay-Cheng, L.Y. (Aug., 2001). SexEd.com: Values and norms in Web-based sexuality education. Journal of Sex Research, 38(3), 241-251.

Beebe, T.J., Asche, S.E., Harrison, P.A., & Quinlan, K.B. (Aug., 2004). Heightened vulnerability and increased risk-taking among adolescent chat room users: Results from a statewide school survey. Journal of Adolescent Health, 35(2), 116-123.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G. & Rickert, Vaughn I. (2001b). Adolescent cybersurfing for health information: A new resource that crosses barriers. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155, 813-817.

Brown, J.D. (Feb., 2002). Mass media influences on sexuality. Journal of Sex Research, 39(1), 42-45.
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Adolescent Development

Words: 1909 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54397299

There are multiple stages of development that all children go through. The depth and breadth of these developmental changes ebb and flow greatly as growing children move from one stage of development to the next. Overall, there are several major developmental stages in the life of a child. There are the toddler years, the prepubescent years and the adolescent/teenage years. The brief literature review that follows in this report shall focus on the last of those. To be complete with this analysis, adolescence is not the end of human development given that many suggest that development extends into the 20's and 30's. Even so, the adolescent years of development are hailed by many as being the most pivotal, at least in some regards. While many would debate the above, it is clear that the adolescent years are among the most important.

Analysis

Regardless of the development or life stage that…… [Read More]

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Adolescent Literacy Levels Reading and

Words: 1977 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99128126

Increased vocabulary levels leads to increases in reading comprehension. Students with higher levels of vocabulary can also express themselves in more unique and complex formats, essentially increasing their ability to comment on the reading material in a way that better correlates with their exact emotions or experiences associated with that reading material.

Writing summaries for reading material is another method of using writing exercises to increase literacy levels. Teachers should implement lessons were students write hierarchal summaries that help organize the structure of reading material in a shape that is more familiar and understandable to students (Meltzer, Cook, & Clark, 2011). Writing summaries force students to internalize the material and reassert it in a different way. This further engages them with the texts, as they are forced to put the material in their own words.

Thirdly, using student-generated content to expose weaknesses in understanding can play a key role. Having…… [Read More]

References

Guthrie, John T. (2001). Contexts for engagement and motivation in reading. Reading Online. 4(8). Retrieved September 21, 2012 from http://www.readingonline.org/articles/art_index.asp?HREF=/articles/handbook/guthrie/index.html

Guthrie, John T. (2012). Adolescent literacy: Issues, knowledge base, design principles, and challenges. Center on Instruction. Web. Retrieved September 21, 2012 from  http://centeroninstruction.org/ 

Melzter, Julie, Cook, Nancy, & Clark, Holly. (2011). Adolescent Literary Resources: Linking Research and Practice. Center for Resource Management. Brown University. Web. Retrieved September 20, 2012 from www.alliance.brown.edu/pubs/adlit/alr_lrp.pdf
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Adolescent's Perception on Himself Herself or

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80717043

Self-esteem must be combined with other components of emotional distress, such as the factors which affect perceptions of the self and of other peers. Factors should include competence, confidence, and acceptance, among others.

Behaviors that are considered to be negative by society may not be the factors that most strongly affect self-perceptions and self-esteem, however. As noted by Mosley (1995), factors which are interpreted and internalized as negative will have a significant impact on self-esteem, even if they are not socially irresponsible. Mosley's example is that adolescent receipt of welfare is associated with lower levels of perceived self-worth. Mosley notes the importance of self-esteem on the mental health and ability of children and adolescents, as noted in previous research (Wilson & Portes, 1975 as cited in Mosley, 1995). Rosenberg and Pearlin (1978) found little relationship between social class and self-esteem, while other researchers have found conclusive links between income/class and…… [Read More]

The traditional two-dimensional views of self-esteem must be abandoned for it to be an effectual method of measure. High self-esteem does not necessarily create a healthy adolescent. Campbell and Foddis (2003) notes the high levels of self-esteem in murderers, rapists, and other social deviants. In these cases, the perpetrator may be affected by perception of others as inferior, therefore justifying his or her actions, or may be affected by the perception of self, regardless of self-esteem. How high one's perception of self is may be an accurate way to determine the likelihood of social deviance. Of course, there are many other factors to be considered as well.

Most research does not take all, or even many, of the factors necessary for developing an understanding of the adolescent situation. Taking a global approach to self-esteem that would include perceptions of the self and perceptions of others, as well as self-esteem levels, may reveal some understanding of adolescent reactions and behavior. The proposed research being approached presently would take global factors into consideration rather than merely focusing on one or two individual factors which would not reveal a complete picture.

The perception of
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Adolescent Obesity Prevention Programs Focus

Words: 327 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1231543



This study can apply to just about any overweight adolescent, and it is important because that is a growing segment of America's overweight population. The researchers concluded this is a "sensitive population," and that is true. Many studies have shown that this can be the time lifelong eating habits develop, including eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. Thus, discovering what works and motivates adolescents when they are dieting can lead to reduced numbers of young people suffering from these diseases as well as obesity.

A chose this article because I have had friends with eating disorders, and friends who are overweight from a young age. I think it is important to find ways to educated adolescents so the obesity problem lessens, and they develop healthy eating habits early in their lives.

eferences

L. Shepherd, D. Neumark-Aztainer, K. Beyer, et al. "Should Adolescent Obesity Prevention Programs Focus on Calories?" Nutrition…… [Read More]

References

L. Shepherd, D. Neumark-Aztainer, K. Beyer, et al. "Should Adolescent Obesity Prevention Programs Focus on Calories?" Nutrition Research Newsletter, Oct. 2006. 30 Jan. 2007. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0887/is_10_25/ai_n16807654
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Adolescent's Motivation to Read Assessment

Words: 2302 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97299522

(Reading for the 21st Century: Adolescent Literacy Teaching and Learning Strategies," 2004)

2. Alphabetic Principle-related Skills: This includes: "phonemic awareness, the ability to manipulate the sounds of oral language and phonics and the relationship of letters to sound." (Ibid) Strategies includes instruction" that focuses on high-frequency, sound- spelling relationships." (Ibid)

3. Fluency: This is the ability to read "quickly, accurately and with appropriate expression." (Ibid) Strategies include: "guided oral reading and repeated reading" (Ibid) for improving fluency and comprehension.

4. Vocabulary: The size of the learner's vocabulary is that which leads to "large variations in reading ability." (Ibid) Strategies include "direct [and] explicit instruction and learning from context while reading" (Ibid) for increasing vocabulary among students.

5. Reading Comprehension: This is the most "apparent deficit in students' reading abilities at the secondary level." (Ibid) Strategies include the following:

a) Comprehensive monitoring;

b) Cooperative learning;

Graphic organizations;

d) Story structure;

e)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davey, Heidi (2006) Motivation and Adolescent and Adult Readers. PowerPoint presentation. Hoffman Estates High School, Northern Illinois University. Online available at  http://www.reading.ie/conferences/2006/Motivation%20and%20the%20Adolescent%20Reader.ppt .

Alvermann, Donna E. (2001) Effective Literacy Instruction for Adolescents. National Reading Conference (NRC) position paper - revised. 25 Oct 2001. Online available at http://www.coe.uga.edu/reading/faculty/alvermann/effective2.pdf.

Reading Literacy for the 21st Century (2004) published online and available at http://www.all4ed.org/publications/Reading%20for%2021st%20Century.pdf.

Wigfield, Alan (nd) Motivation for Literacy During Adolescence. Online available at http://www.soe.umich.edu/events/als/downloads/wigfield.pdf.
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Adolescent Self-Esteem The Factors That

Words: 1494 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3556578

Unfortunately, for those individuals who did not use direct coping strategies but instead used the kind of coping that distances one's thoughts, emotions, and physical presence from the stressor (e.g., denial and wishful thinking) or disengages completely (e.g., escape and emotional numbing) to cope with discrimination stress tended to have lower self-esteem.

Consequences/Effects of Low Self-Esteem

A number of studies have shown that low self-esteem is predictive of negative outcomes. Parker et al. (2005) found that girls and adolescents with low self-worth reported the greatest jealousy of friends and that a reputation for being jealous of friends was associated with aggressive behavior and other peer adjustment difficulties, including loneliness.

Donnellan et al. (2005) found a link between low self-esteem and externalizing problems such as aggression, antisocial behavior, and delinquency. The authors cited osenberg (1965), who suggested that low self-esteem weakens ties to society and weaker ties to society decrease conformity…… [Read More]

References

Donnellan, M.B., Trzesniewski, K.H., Robins, R.W., Moffitt, T.E. & Caspi, A. (2005). Low self-esteem is related to aggression, antisocial behavior, and delinquency. Psychological Science, 15, 328-335.

Edwards, L.M. & Romero, A.J. (2008). Coping with discrimination among Mexican descent adolescents. Marquette University Education Faculty Research and Publications. Retrieved from http://epublications.marquette.edu/edu fac/59.

Krayer, A., Ingledew, D.K. & Iphofen, K. (2008). Social comparison and body image in adolescence: a grounded theory approach. Health Education Research, 23. 892-903.

Martinez, I & Garcia, J.F. (2008). Internalization of values and self-esteem among Brazilian teenagers from authoritative, indulgent, authoritarian, and neglectful homes. Adolescence, 43, 19-29.
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Adolescent Substance Abuse and Suicide

Words: 387 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56794299

Substance Abuse and Suicide isk Among Adolescents

Adolescents are at high risk for suicidal ideations, behaviors, attempts, and suicide.

Adolescent needs for independence, identity formation, and peer acceptance increase risk-taking behavior.

Suicide is the third-leading cause of death among people aged 15-24.

Suicide is the main reason for referrals for child and adolescent emergency psychiatric services.

There has been a steady increase in adolescent drug abuse in the United States since 1960.

Substance abuse has been proposed as a risk factor for suicidal behavior.

The study examined whether there was an association between drug abuse and suicidal behavior and whether drug abuse was specifically a risk factor for suicide.

The data collection process was a literature review conducted by two people independtly examining peer reviewed articles for relevancy and other factors, such as language, leaving 17 articles for examination. The results were then extracted and presented in a table along…… [Read More]

References

Pompili, M., Serafini, G., Innamorati, M., Biondi, M., Siracusano, A., Di Giannantonio, M.,

Giupponi, G., Amore, M., Lester, D., Girardi, P., Moller-Leimkuhler, A.M. (2012). Substance abuse and suicide risk among adolescents. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci, 262, 469-485. doi: 10.1007/s00406-012-0292-0.
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Adolescent Substance Abuse and Mental Illness

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71025039

Psychiatric Disorders

There is a high correlation between youth with substance abuse problems and youth with mental illness. Often, the substance abuse is a means of self-medicating. There are a lot of potential underlying factors for this high comorbidity, but it is important to recognize that the comorbidity exists, and it has implications for treatment. Proper psychiatric care is often required in concert with addiction treatment interventions, in order to ensure that youth facing these issues are able to overcome their addictions.

Psychiatric Disorders

There are a number of psychiatric disorders that can occur with substance abuse during adolescence. For example, among those with an alcohol use disorder, 37% had comorbidity with a mental disorder. The odds are particularly high for multiple addictive disorders, such as drug use disorders. Some of the most common comorbidities with substance abuse disorders are antisocial personality disorder, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders (egier et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Bukstein, O., Brent, D. & Kaminer, Y. (1989). Comorbidity of substance and other psychiatric disorders in adolescents. American Journal of Psychiatry. Vol. 146 (9) 1131-1141.

Greenbaum, P., Prange, M., Friedman, R. & Silver, S. (1991). Substance abuse prevalence and comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders among adolescents with severe emotional disturbances. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Vol. 30 (4) 575-583.

NIH (2011). Comorbidity: Addiction and other mental disorders. NIH.gov. Retrieved April 11, 2016 from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/comorbidity-addiction-other-mental-disorders

NIH (2016). Comorbidity: Addiction and other mental illnesses. National Institute of Drug Abuse Retrieved April 11, 2016 from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/comorbidity-addiction-other-mental-illnesses/why-do-drug-use-disorders-often-co-occur-other-mental-illnesses
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Adolescent Diabetes Complicating Factors

Words: 615 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18309429

bevy of information about diabetes and the many different considerations for treatment that pertain to it. In this regard I found it quite comprehensive. It provides a good deal of detail about treating this condition from administering insulin to the different ways the human body can change: and the ways those changes inherently affect treatment. The article is loosely structured around a case study of an adolescent diabetes patient who is incurring difficulty with managing type 1 diabetes. Her story is used as a framework for the author's explanation of treatment concerns pertaining to adolescents which involves physical attributes, hormonal ones, and even social ones. The author explores the different types of diabetes and a number of different options for managing this condition. The focus of the way the majority of the information is presented, however, is within a context that applies to adolescents.

I learned a substantial amount of…… [Read More]

References

Trast, J. (2014). CE: diabetes and puberty: A glycemic challenge. American Journal of Nursing. 114(7), 26-35.
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Adolescents' Coming of Age Through Struggle

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53944644

strength"-Oprah infrey:

The coming-of-age struggles of to Kill a Mockingbird and Romeo and Juliet

Although written in radically different styles (one is written from the perspective of an Elizabethan playwright, one is written in the voice of the child), at radically different eras, and in completely different media (one is a play, the other is a drama), both illiam Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird can be classified as coming-of-age dramas. In Romeo and Juliet, the teenage protagonists gain a sadder and more sophisticated understanding of the conflict-ridden world in which they live as a result of their love for one another. In To Kill a Mockingbird, the young narrator Scout comes to better understand the evils of the simmering racial tensions which exists within polite Southern society. Through the emotional struggles they personally undergo and witness both characters attain new levels of maturity they…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York: Grand Central Publishing, 1988.

Shakespeare, William. Romeo & Juliet. No Fear Shakespeare. Web. 31 May 2015.
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Obesity and Adolescent Drug Abuse

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93637774

Adolescent Obesity and Drug Abuse -- Literature eview

Discipline I

The work of Brownson, et al. (2010) states that childhood obesity "…is a serious public health problem." In fact, "obesity rates have increased threefold among U.S. children and adolescents. Approximately 16% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 29 years are obese." (Brownson, et al., 2010) isk factors include hypertension and high cholesterol as well as increased risk of cardiovascular disease and incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. (Brownson, et al., 2010, paraphrased) Health professionals identify overweight and obesity through use of the Body Mass Index (BMI), which is calculated by measuring the proportion of weight to height. (Eisenberg, adunovich, and Brennan, 2007, paraphrased) The criteria used for categorizing BMI for children are both age and sex-specific and often referred to as BMI-for-age. BMI-for-age weight status categories and the corresponding percentiles are listed in Appendix 'A' following this study.…… [Read More]

Rates of youth obesity is reported to vary among different groups with African-American, non-Hispanic girls and Mexican-American boys being the groups most likely to be obese. (Eisenberg, Radunovich, and Brennan, 2007, paraphrased) African-American females are reported to "remain at the highest risk, and have substantial rates of obesity-related diseases and causes of death." (Eisenberg, Radunovich, and Brennan, 2007) It is reported that there is "no assessment of body composition inherent in BMI" as "BMI identifies people who are at risk for having high levels of excessive body fat but it does not actually determine body fat. Anthropometric measurements, such as subscapular and triceps skinfolds and bioelectrical impendence are commonly used to assess body fatness in clinical settings." (Fleming and Towey, 2003) The causes of adolescent obesity are stated to include: (1) parental influence; (2) school influence; and (3) community influences. (Fleming and Towey, 2003)

Discipline II & Integration

Drug addiction among adolescents is a problem that requires the benefit of more research as new findings have shed light on the origins of addiction. The work of Nestler (2004) reports that one of the mechanisms that result from drug abuse and that serves to induce relatively long-lasting changes in the brain resulting in the addictive state is the mechanism of regulation of gene expression. In other words, addiction is in reality a disease directly related to the individual's genetics. The two transcription factors are stated by Nestler to be those as follows: (1) CREB (CAMP response element binding protein); and (3) ?FosB, which contributes to drug-induced changes in gene expression. (Nestler, 2004) Both of these are reported as of the nature that are activated "…in the nucleus accumbens, a major brain reward region, but mediate different aspects of the addicted state." (Nestler, 2004) CREB is stated to be the mediator of a type of tolerance and dependence of the nature that dulls the individual's sensitivity to "subsequent drug exposure) as well as contributing to an emotional state characterized by negativity during early withdrawal stages. FosB on the other hand is the mediator of "a state of relatively prolonged sensitization to drug exposure and may contribute to the increased drive and motivation for drug, which is a core symptom of addictive disorders. There is stated to be a need to better understand how CREB and ?FosB, acting together in other various drug-induced nucleus accumbens changes and other regions
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Treating Adolescents With Substance Abuse Disorders

Words: 1945 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69501873

Adolescent Substance Abuse

Substance abuse, commonly referred to as drug abuse and alcohol abuse, has recently gained popularity amid the youth of America. This has been confirmed by SAMHSA (2003) whose survey indicated that around 2.2 million teenagers were convicted of being involved in substance abuse in 2003. Teenage is called the golden period of a person's life as this is full of excitement and energy. People are willing to experience all the good and bad things in life, and for some natural reason, bad things tend to be more attractive. Therefore, the inclination of youth towards excessive usage of drugs and alcohol is not surprising. However, the teenage period does not last long. If people continue the same activity as adults, this can ruin a person's social, academic life, putting a stop to his professional career. This makes it a critical problem that should be resolved as a priority.…… [Read More]

References

Diller, J.V. (2007). Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services. 3rd ed. pp. 28.

Mark, T.L, Song, X., Vandivort, R., Duffy, S., Buttler, J., Coffey, R., Schabert, V. (2009). Characterizing substance abuse programs that treat adolescents. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/samhsa_news/VolumeXIV_5/article12.pdf

SAMHSA. (2003). Results from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Retrieved from http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/nhsda/2k3nsduh/2k3Results.htm

Tripodi, S.J.; Bender, K; Litschge, C; Vaughn, V.G. (2010). Interventions for Reducing Adolescent Alcohol Abuse: A Meta-analytic Review. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010; 164(1):85-91

 

 

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